Saturday, December 30, 2006

The Clash: If Music Could Talk [1980]

Alles, das wir machen, ist Musik.

From the lopsided-triple album Sandinista! A fine number to sign off the year to.

"Taking cover in the bunker tonight
Waiting for Bo Diddley's headlights
I feel alright
Gotta Fender Stratosphere
I can do anything tonight
It's in neon lights an' global rights
Frank? He's on the phone
There ain't no German girl outside
But who cares when its warm inside?
With music-"

Supertramp: Logical Song [1979]

Buy the album here.

Bob Dylan: It Hurts Me Too [1970]

Off Dylan's throw-away album "Self Portrait".

"What is this shit?"

Buy this shit here.

When did CDNow become part of Amazon?
Juliane Werding: Postfach auf der Grunen Wiese [1978]

This is my New Year's song. I'm going to be in transit the next couple of days, so I needed to post it now. Anyways, happy New Year everybody! Let's all get "into the mix" in '07!

Isaac Hayes: Breakthrough [1974]

from the soundtrack to the film Truck Turner

Keith Richards: Please Please Me [197?]

A fascinating studio outtake in which Sir Keith gamely warbles through the Lennon/McCartney classic, struggles to find the right chord for the "come on, come on" part, refuses to do the "horrible Beatles bridge" but then does it anyway, alters one chord and says "See, I could have written it better."

Another installment in our ongoing series of drunken Beatles/Stones outtakes with the wrong person singing. For the first installment see here.

Zeitgeist note: Moistworks apparently posted this like 2 hours ago. I have had this bootleg for years and was planning to post this all day. Weird.

Friday, December 29, 2006

Emitt Rhodes: She's Such a Beauty [1970]

Playing all the instruments and recording it himself boy wizard channels Paul McCartney and produces a forgotten gem of a solo album. This particular track is the lost sister of 'Marth My Dear'.

Abaco Dream (AKA Sly & The Family Stone): Life And Death In G & A [1969]
...and the A-side: Cat Woman

This is Sly & The Family Stone recording under a pseudonym ("Abaco Dream") and for a different label (A&M instead of Epic). I read about this record in Peter Shapiro's Turn The Beat Around (one of the finest pieces of disco scholarship I've come across recently). Apparently DJ Frankie Grasso used to play "Life And Death" often in the early days of The Sanctuary. Surprisingly, I couldn't find the song anywhere, and had to buy the original 45 on eBay. Please excuse the vinyl scratchiness -- this record is older than I am.

"Cat Woman" (the A-side of the single, not the B-side) is self-explanatory.
Talking Heads: The Big Country [1978]

Originally released on "More Songs About Building And Food", I prefer this version off "The Name Of This Band Is Talking Heads". You can sense the immediate disdain for the suburbs in David Byrne's voice. Look at them eat it; I guess it tastes real good...

I saw Byrne perform the country version of The Big Country as part of his brief set at the 826 New York benefit last August. The disdain was replaced by, what seemed to be, near longing.

Buy quintessential Talking Heads here.

Thursday, December 28, 2006

Jean-Michel Jarre: Pop Corn [1971]

I don't know too much about Jean-Michel or his music, but everything I have heard so far has been bitchin'. "Pop Corn" takes a spaghetti Western-esque theme (speaking of Morricone) and refracts it through a proto-electronica lens.

Note: the photo above shows the composer posing in front of some Polish DVDs.

William Bell: Everyday Will Be Like A Holiday [1967]

Big B is grappling with some technical demons down in Dallas so he asked me to say this on his behalf:

"Here's a vintage soul tune to wind down the year with. A Booker T. Jones / William Bell composition recorded at the legendary studio Stax. The breakdown before the 2 minute mark is brilliant—seconds of sleigh bells, with a touch of guitar, a deep bass walk, vocals and then horns blowing the melody 'jingle all the way' to round everything out."

Wednesday, December 27, 2006

Ennio Morricone: Cavallina a Cavallo [1979]

This in anticipation of Morricone's honorary Oscar to be awarded in February. If you associate his music with the dramatic score of The Mission or the loping melodies of various spaghetti westerns, listen to this baby. It is from a 1979 film entitled Dedicato Al Mare Egeo (Dedicated to the Aegean Sea). It's a film I have not yet seen, but it sounds very, very, very promising indeed...
The Police: When The World Is Running Down You Make The Best Of What's Still Around [1980]

from Zenyatta Mondatta

Historical note: Is this the first use of the word "VCR" in a rock song?

Tuesday, December 26, 2006

James Brown:
Let Yourself Go>There Was A Time>I Feel All Right
Kansas City

Recorded Live At The Apollo, June 25, 1967

"I may not do the dance as well as you
But you can bet your bottom dollar,
You'll never hear me holler
I'll do the best that I can do."

Thanks for everything, James.
Getting away from the long seventies for a post, I've put together a mix of some tracks I was listening to in 2006.

Two songs I didn't put on the mix, but enjoyed this year:
Thom Yorke: Harrowdown Hill (extended mix) [2006]
Morrissey: A Song From Under the Floorboards [2006]

Thom Yorke's album is an underrated solo debut, and the Morrissey track is a B-Side cover to "Ringmaster of the Tormentors". After a few listens to A Song From Under The Floorboards, I found myself listening to-nearly exclusively-Magazine for a few weeks.

Hear some Magazine by clicking here.

A Some Songs 2006 mix and tracklisting can be found here.

And finally, here's the video to Harrowdown Hill.

Sunday, December 24, 2006

W.A. Mozart: Ach, ich fuhl's (aria from The Magic Flute) [1984]

soprano: Dame Margaret Price
Staatskapelle Dresden conducted by Sir Colin Davis

Saturday, December 23, 2006

Television: Double Exposure [1975]

The early demo, produced by Brian Eno, features Richard Hell thumping on bass, shortly before he left the band to help found the Heartbreakers with members of the New York Dolls.

Brilliance from YouTube showing Hell and Verlaine not playing together.

And Eno wondering how large a village should be, below.

Support Television by purchasing one of the finest albums of the 1970s here.
Joy Division: As You Said [1980]

Joy Division sans Ian on mic. B-side from the 7" titled "Flexidisc" which included Komakino and Incubation.

'Control' the movie about the late Ian Curtis will be out next spring:

The Staple Singers: Will The Circle Be Unbroken [1968]

This is really good for rocking down the highway. Pops's vocal and tremelo guitar are amazing, and everything is lovingly drenched with reverb.

Fun fact: Pops's real name was Roebuck and his brother's name was Sears.

Available on the CD Freedom Highway

Friday, December 22, 2006

David Bowie: John, I'm Only Dancing (Again) [1974]

An interesting funked-up reimagining of his 1972 hit, recorded at Sigma Sound in Philadelphia during the Young Americans sessions. Love the droning bassline on the chorus (courtesy of Willie Weeks).

Thursday, December 21, 2006

Brian Eno vs Aphex Twin: Rhubarb and Villages [2005]

I came across this feel-good gem last year while bed-bound from surgery and on vicodin.

There's a lot to learn from artists...
Lou Reed featuring Antony: Candy Says [2006]

Recorded live at St. Ann's Warehouse on December 14th, 2006

Doug Yule doesn't compare on the original, released by The Velvet Underground in 1969.

If you don't feel anything around the 2:45 mark, you might want to think about what kind of person you are and what you are doing with your life.
Mission of Burma: All World Cowboy Romance [1981]

This from the "Signals, Calls, and Marches" EP.

I've always rather thought that this sweeping song is cinematically evocative. Ya heard?

The Stranglers: The European Female (In Celebration Of) [1983]

from the album Feline

I know I just posted some Stranglers like a week ago, but this song is ruling my brain right now. Interesting dissonance on the chorus. I guess these guys were crazy musical geniuses. Looking forward to delving deeper into their catalogue...

Wednesday, December 20, 2006

Willie Nelson: Me and Paul [1971]

After taking several readings I'm surprised to find my mind still fairly sound...
Grace Jones: La Vie En Rose [1977]
Edith Piaf: La Vie En Rose [1946]

written by Edith Piaf and Louiguy

Grace's version appears on the album Portfolio and also on A Tom Moulton Mix

For other Tom Moulton-related posts, see here, here, and here

Tuesday, December 19, 2006

PIL: Ease [1986]

Vox: John Lydon
Drums: Ginger Baker
Synth: Ryuichi Sakamoto
Guitar: Steve Vai

Ryuichi Sakamoto can also be heard on this post.

Monday, December 18, 2006

Blondie: Rapture (extended mix) [1980]
available on the CD reissue of Autoamerican

bonus tracks:
Fab Five Freddy: Down By Law [1982]
available on Dread Meets B-Boys Downtown

The Chief Rocker Busy Bee vs. Lil Rodney Cee with D.J. Grand Wizard Theodore: M.C. Battle [1982]
from the soundtrack to the film Wild Style

Since Debbie name-checks Fab Five Freddy in her rap, I thought it would be fun to include a cut from Freddy himself. "Down By Law" features Blondie's Chris Stein on guitar, and is a good example of a slightly loose rhythmic feel that only a live drummer can create. The "M.C. Battle" features some swinging freestyles over Freddy's beat.
Robert Palmer: I Dream of Wires [1980]

Featuring its writer, Gary Numan, on synthesizer.

Here, Numan talks about his Asperger's and fast cars.

Sunday, December 17, 2006

Lou Reed: Caroline Says I [1973]

Had to post a second Reed track (soon following last week's) after seeing Berlin performed at St. Ann's, which was really something special.

Copies of the St. Ann's show are available on the Internet... if you search around a bit.
Archie Bell & The Drells: Tighten Up [1967]

The story goes that Archie wrote this one hit boogie while on military leave in Houston, Texas. Not looking forward to leaving for Vietnam, his simple yet infectious call to 'Tighten Up' brought millions of listeners to the dance floor. Definitely reminiscent of many a James Brown tune. Now, don't go sayin' nothing good ever came from Texas!

(posted by Big B)

dedicated to Ahmet Ertegun

Saturday, December 16, 2006

Nick Drake: Black Eyed Dog [1974]

Saturday morning music.

Friday, December 15, 2006

Neu!: E-Musik [1975]

Long before the book group there was the band...enjoy this from Neu '75 and tell me -- is that an animal growling somewhere around the 8 minute mark?
Original Concept: Can You Feel It? [1986]

produced by Concept and Rick Rubin

Thursday, December 14, 2006

T. Rex: Baby Strange

recorded live at Wembley Empire Pool, 18th March, 1972
from the soundtrack to the film Born To Boogie

Marc's guitar isn't what you would call "fully in tune" on this, but that's just part of the fun!

Wednesday, December 13, 2006

Dame Shirley Bassey: You've Made Me So Very Happy (Gordy Jr./Holloway/Wilson/Holloway)
from the classic Love, Life And Feelings [1976]

Produced by Martin Davis
Engineered by Martin Rushent
Arranged and conducted by Arthur Greenslade

Pretty insane production on this. Love the phased guitar. Also, notice what the bass player plays behind the words "Cause you came and you took control / You touched my very soul."

Tuesday, December 12, 2006

The Stranglers: Tank [1978]

Monday, December 11, 2006

Kool Blues: Can We Try Love Again [1974]
Eddie Kendricks:
Keep On Truckin' (extended Tom Moulton mix)
Girl You Need A Change Of Mind (long version)

Sunday, December 10, 2006

Thelonious Monk: Dinah and I Surrender, Dear [1965]

I happened to pass by Minton's Playhouse in a cab yesterday. I had no idea this place still existed; apparently it just reopened in May after a 32 year hiatus. Anyway, Thelonious was the house pianist at Minton's in the '40s, and so in celebration of Thelonious and of Minton's here are a couple tracks from the classic Solo Monk LP.

"Dinah" was written by Harry Akst, Sam Lewis, and Joe Young in 1925. It was a hit for Ethel Waters in 1926, before my mother was born.

"I Surrender, Dear" was written by Harry Barris and Gordon Clifford in 1931, and performed by Bing Crosby in a movie of the same name.
The Slits: Instant Hit [1979]

(Check out the credit at the beginning of the video.)

Thank Big B for this.

Saturday, December 09, 2006

Yellow Magic Orchestra: Pure Jam [1981]

This must be the ugliest piece of bread
I've ever eaten
Wrapped in a foil-like substance
It's an unidentified object
Shapelessly square
God it's so ugly
[Jam desho]
I wonder why
Maybe the answer lies
[Sore jam desho, dozo]
In the thickness or the size

Friday, December 08, 2006

Cymande: Bra [1972]

Thursday, December 07, 2006

Lou Reed: The Day John Kennedy Died [1982]

Lou had this to say about the song upon its release: “I am one of those people who really believed in John Kennedy, and I don’t care if he bought the election. I don’t care about any of that stuff… or he got us into Vietnam. I think he would have gotten us out… I adored John Kennedy and thought he could really turn everything around. Some people would say it was misplaced idealism. Well maybe. I don’t think so. But nevertheless that’s the way it was for me the day John Kennedy died. I am not into politics and I don’t have any real feelings about politics, one way or the other; except I felt bad here and I wrote a song about it.”

Wednesday, December 06, 2006

Rose Royce: Love Don't Live Here Anymore [1978]

written by Miles Gregory
produced by Norman Whitfield

In July of '79, Miles Davis wanted to do a recording of this song and asked
Paul Buckmaster to begin work on an arrangement. [source: Paul Tigin: Miles Beyond]
Miles's version never surfaced, but the song was later covered by Madonna, among others.

Tuesday, December 05, 2006

The Beatles: I'm So Tired (Paul vocal) [1968]

This one comes to us courtesy of Big B, holding down Dallas, TX. Woot!

Monday, December 04, 2006

Magazine: Definitive Gaze [1978]

posted by Mike
The Fixx: Reach The Beach [1983]

Friday, December 01, 2006

Rolling Stones: Miss You (extended 8 minute version) [1978]

don't miss the bass-and-drums break at the 3:08 mark!